CFL Lighting Retrofit Terms © 2013
GREEN LIGHT KITS,  Glossary of  Retrofit Lighting Terms

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: An electrician can measure the voltage in the circuits in the lights in your office. The circuits may all be 120 volt OR they may be 208 /277 volts.

Our kits are all wired for 120 VOLT ONLY, not higher voltages. If you have higher voltages, you may need rewiring, or power lead changes to 120 Volts to retrofit your fixtures.

KNOW THE VOLTAGES BEFORE ANYONE TOUCHES ANY WIRES. 

If you do not know the voltages…STOP…Call an Experienced Electrician. He can rewire the circuits, and may be able to use some, or all, of the wiring in place.

High voltages can kill or incapacitate you, and that includes 120 Volt AC… the current in your own living room.

Ballasts Containing Harmful Chemicals: dos and don’ts: 

It is well known that some ballasts used in fluorescent light fixtures contain harmful chemicals. All ballasts produced in the last 23 years contain none of the most harmful chemicals, PCB’s. Ballasts containing harmful chemicals, PCB’s  (Polyclorinated Biphenyl) were produced until the mid to late 1970’s. The cut off date is 1979. Most ballasts that contain PCB’s are long past their useful life, which is rated at 10 to 15 years. Many ballasts produced in the last 20 years will say No PCB’s. If you encounter ballasts that are over 23 years old, they may contain PCB’s and should be treated as such. These ballasts require secure disposal, and cannot be put into the waste stream.


Ballast Shield Cover
The ballast in a fluorescent light fixture is covered with a metal shield, or raceway, as is its wiring harness. The cover may be in several places in the fixture, but usually consists of a protective metal raceway, to prevent shorting of the wiring harness. This cover traps heat created by the ballast, which can damage the ballast and harness, over time. Failures of the ballast or harness, are the second most common issue in the failure of fluorescent lighting. The most common failure is a linear fluorescent lamp, or a terminal end failure.

 

Ballast Wiring Harness Overheating, Shorting, or Fraying:
Most fluorescent light fixtures have one or more ballasts, or transformers. They are most often free standing, in a covered shield, and are wired into the fixture with a multi-color wiring array designed to distribute power. They can be made of several materials, but the most common failure comes from overheating of the ballast or breakage of the insulation on the wires due to excess heat. Overheated ballasts may continue to function, but must be replaced.

 

Ceramic Edison Fixture Sockets
The Medium Base Socket that was originally developed by Thomas Edison is referred to the the Edison Style Socket. It is the most commonly found base in light fixtures in use in the World. It is traditionally run on either 50 or 60 cycle, Alternating Current, 110 to 120 volt circuits for lighting. In its most durable form, it is produced with a ceramic body and a base metal liner and electrode tab, to allow long life. Ceramic sockets outlast plastic and all-metal sockets in life expectancy, and are more durable in Commercial use. 

 

CFL Basics 
CFL stands for Compact Fluorescent Lamp. The CFL is covered in other sections of this website (citation). Most CFL’s are high efficiency Edison base screw in light bulbs that have a compact voltage conversion system built into their base and a tubular structure, that fluoresces when charged with electrons shot from this circuit into compounds stored in the lamp itself. They are more efficient than most standard linear fluorescent lamps as they have miniaturized electronics, and small amounts of fluorescent compounds in a very compact surface area. CFL’s fluoresce with less heat than their larger cousins the linear fluorescents, and therefore use less wattage to give off the same quantity of light in Lumens. As a rule of thumb, the electricity is either used to make light, or make  heat. The CFL is simply able to convert more light, and produce less heat, from energy supplied, than most other sources. Today’s CFL’s are instant on and do not flicker, as some early models once did. They are inexpensive by comparison, in the 2 dollar range, and have an expected life of 8 to 10 thousand hours. 

 

CFL to Other Lamp Equivalents  
This is an index that gives the output in lumens comparing CFL lamps, LED lamps, and Incandescent lamps. In general a CFL lamps use about 25% of the wattage required to put out as much light (measured in lumens) as an incandescent light bulb.

As an example a 13 to 14 watt CFL puts out between 800 and 850 lumens, approximately the same output as a 60 watt incandescent bulb. Currently (2012), the same approximate wattage is used by a comparable LED array to make the same number of Lumens, (800 to 850) as a 60 watt incandescent lamp, or a 13 to 14 watt CFL lamp.

 

Closed  Metal  Raceway
Every suspended ceiling light fixture produced in the last 30 years has a cover that shields the ballast and wiring. This is an example of a closed metal raceway. In the NEC code, a closed metal raceway must fully enclose the contents from direct exposure. There is no intent to stop the passage of air, but there is an intent to keep out pests and to eliminate direct contact with the operational harness, when the light is in use.

 

Communication Wiring and Fluorescent Fixtures
Communication wiring that is used in modern voice and data networks should not be put in place over the top of conventional fluorescent light fixtures. Although this is a common practice, it should be avoided for a simple reason. The efficiency of the voice and data system may be affected by the frequencies and heat the fixture ballast produces. This reduces the speed and consistency of these networks, causing signal and content loss.

 

Computing Ballast Energy Usage in Fluorescent Fixtures
All fluorescent ballasts induce the signal to change that is received by the supply current.
In doing so, the ballast adds drag or resistance to the circuit. This is easily noticed when the fixture is serviced, as the operating ballast will often be warm to the touch. This heat is a by-product of the operation of the fluorescent circuit. Ballasts are rated on the label, for the energy used in the circuit and lamps. As an example a circuit using two 40 watt 4 foot tubes will usually have a ballast that uses between 10 and 16 watts. The method to analyze the usage is to use the formula watts equals amps times volts, or W = A x V.

The amperage rating is usually listed on the ballast. The voltage reference is 120V in most circuits, but do check it out for higher voltage supplies. The amperage rating may be a bit obscure, but it will be there. Most fluorescent ballasts will use 8 to 20 watts. Many fixtures have more than one ballast.

 

CRI or Color Rendering Index
The Color Rendering Index is a measurement of the effectiveness of the Source of light.
CRI is defined by the International Commission on Illumination as: “Effect of an illuminant on the color appearance of objects by conscious or subconscious color comparison with their color appearance under a reference illuminant”. OK Great… Now then, what they mean is how well do the colors under a given light appear to the person seeing them as true, distinct, and correct. The Index runs from 0 to 100. The higher the reading, the closer the light is to natural full color appearance. The new reference point of note is 80 plus. All lighting now produced must be 81 CRI or higher. Many older linear fluorescent lamps cannot meet this standard and are discontinued.

 

Diffuser Panels
Many suspended ceiling light fixtures use a diffuser system, that is mounted below the fluorescent tubes and acts to spread out the light. Bare tubes are not pleasing. For this reason the diffuser acts to reflect downward the light source with small gradient peaks that enhance the travel of the light to the surface. These panels can age and yellow, causing less light to come from the fixture. If the diffuser is yellowed it is not expensive to replace it…. usually about 5 to 8 dollars.

 

Diffuser Grids
Some suspended ceiling fixtures do not have diffuser panels, they have been replaced with a 9 square metal grid to hide the tubes, and reflect light downward. The drawback to this system is that the tubes are still visible and many times do not appear attractive to users directly beneath them.

 

Dual Switched Suspended Ceiling Troffer Light Fixtures
Some installations may have fixtures with multiple tubes that are individually switched in pairs. As an example a 2’ by 4’ suspended ceiling troffer fixture may have 4 lamps and 2 ballasts. If so, each pair operates with a separate ballast. In retrofitting the installer may order kits that light only half the lamps at one time, say 2 CFL lamps on one switch and 2 on another. This adds the ability to lower and raise lighting without lamp change.

 

Eight Thousand Hour Life Cycle
The operating life of a circuit is rated in hours. Most CFL lamps are rated at 8,000 plus hours. To put that in perspective, 8,000 hours is over 2 years of 10 hour a day use… every day… year around. In fact it is going on 27 months of use, at 10 hours a day.

 

Electrical Demand Multiplyer
Often misunderstood by Commercial users, The Electrical Demand Multiplyer is a coefficient used to multiply the actual kilowatt hours used, times the greatest demand for a period of time, in any one month. As an example, if you burned $100 worth of electricity at home, would that same amount cost $100 at work? The answer is no. Commercial customers pay a rate that is multiplied by a factor rated at 1.1, minimum, to as high as 4.0, or higher.  This rate is figured by the highest demand the firm has in a segment of time during that month. Generally the segment of time is brief, 12, 15 or 20 minutes. Once the demand has gone up, it does not reset until month’s end. The quotient is KWH times Demand times Rate equals Usage.  The system is used as the supplier must have the power the business needs, set aside for them, at all times. This total amount of required power for all customers is called the Base Load for the Utility.

 

Electrical Phase Balancing
In many Commercial and Industrial buildings the power is delivered at a voltage higher than that which is delivered to the office area (usually 120 Volt in the office). One of the most common is the 480 Volt feed. It is made up of all three phases of the power supplied by base load generation. This power comes to the building from a step down transformer and is by definition to be delivered with a 100% power factor, meaning the power delivered is at full ability to operate electrical devices at the building edge. Costly things can happen to this power as it travels through the Service Entrance and on to the various devices using it. If it is out of phase or phase overlapped, it can cause higher power bills.  These are technical terms, but the meaning is that the three phases are not distinct and as they overlap become less capable of running the devices at their highest efficiency. This requires a phase correction device. ELECTRICIANS ONLY DO THIS CORRECTION

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: An electrician can measure the voltage in the circuits in the lights in your office. The circuits may all be 120 volt OR they may be 208 /277 volts.

Our kits are all wired for 120 VOLT ONLY, not higher voltages. If you have higher voltages, you may need rewiring, or power lead changes to 120 Volts to retrofit your fixtures.
.KNOW THE VOLTAGES BEFORE ANYONE TOUCHES ANY WIRES. 

 If you do not know the Voltages…STOP…Call an Experienced Electrician. He can rewire the circuits, and may be able to use some, or all, of the wiring in place.

High voltages can kill or incapacitate you, and that includes 120 Volt AC.. the current in your own living room.

Electronic Ballasts
Electronics are used in later model ballasts to increase the cycles up to 20,000 cycles or more per second. This is the cycling needed for newer Fluorescent lighting. These ballasts do not contain PCB’s (made after 1979) and do not use as much power to operate, as older magnetic styles. The CFL lamp has an electronic ballast built into every bulb, that is sized for its wattage and light output. 


Fifty Thousand Hour Life
The operating life of a circuit is rated in hours. Most LED lamps are rated at 50,000 plus hours. Unfortunately, almost none have reached that length of operation, so this is an estimate. In addition, LED’s dim with age, and there is no sure way to know when the light level will be insufficient. To put that in perspective, 50,000 hours is over 13 years of 10 hour a day use… every day… year around. 


Fixture Circuit Lock Out / Tag Out
Lock out Tag out is a safety precaution mandated by the Occupational Safety and Health Act or OSHA. In this process all circuits feeding an area to be serviced are tested and the circuit is turned off and locked out…then the circuit and any switching to it are tagged as such. With Lock out Tag out, no one can be injured, as the circuit is not active and must stay inactive until the procedure is reversed. Do not avoid Lock Out Tag Out. Safety is first.
Fluorescent Light Fixture Diffuser Replacement

The diffuser panel is generally about 2 foot by 2 foot or 2 foot by 4 foot. They do vary, so a measurement is in order. These panels can be cut if oversized, making two 2’ by 2 ‘s out of one 2 by 4 diffuser panel.  These panels can age and yellow, causing less light to come from the fixture. If the diffuser is yellowed it is not expensive to replace it…. usually about 5 to 8 dollars.


Fixture Grounding Requirements
The NEC National Code, in every instance, requires the grounding of all light fixtures for safety reasons. Grounding from the metal raceway to the service entrance or a known ground is required. Do not leave retrofitted fixtures ungrounded before you reverse Lock out / Tag out. (See Lock out / Tag out above)


Flicker and Buzz in Fluorescent Light Fixtures
“On demand maintenance” is the single most expensive aspect of the operation of troffer style suspended ceiling light fixtures. This is brought on by the loss of one lamp, and the onset of flickering or buzzing in the other lamp running on that ballast. It is more than annoying, and requires a call to maintenance to improve productivity. The flicker occurs as bursts of energy try to light the dead lamp, and the buzz occurs from ballast strain to provide the needed power to get the lamp lit. Left unserviced, the ballast heats up and eventually fails.


Fluorescence, The How and Why
Fluorescense is caused by electrons in motion, which excite gasses in a tube. The excited gasses glow in response to the frequencies produced in the lamps. The higher the frequency created, the less the lamp flickers, as it starts up or burns out. 


Fluorescent Ballast Identifications
The ballast must come with a label that has a wiring diagram and description of the circuit needs. Older ballasts are heavier and cumbersome. They are not versatile, and can only be used in specified circuits. Newer ballasts are electronic and lightweight. All ballasts will reveal their origin, capacity, and energy usage. It may require math skills to interpolate the amount of energy the ballast uses. Be aware of ballast limitations and rules on disposal…see below.


Fluorescent Lamp Recycling Requirements
All businesses must recycle their fluorescent linear lamps responsibly. No linear fluorescent lamps can be landfilled. In some jurisdictions, households are exempted. But as a rule be aware that you must not just throw used linear fluorescent lamps in the dumpster. See the DOE disposal rules for disposal of mercury bearing lamps.


Fluorescent Plastic Terminal Housings
Most suspended ceiling light fixtures, linear end- to-end fixtures, as well as 4 foot and  8 foot single, and double, lamp fluorescent fixtures  have terminal ends. These are made of plastic and are subject to fatigue. When a terminal cracks it is often difficult to trouble shoot whether that has caused lamp failure or whether another issue has caused the loss of light. The terminal ends are spring loaded metal connectors within the plastic sheath. The terminal ends seldom fail, but the plastic housings often do.


Fluorescent Tube Breakage Considerations
Be very careful with linear fluorescents, that you do not break the lamps. Due to their lengths, between 18 inches and 8 feet, it is necessary to handle all linear fluorescents with great care. Use a respirator if you should break a lamp. The powder has heavy metals in it and it can be hazardous. It is not advised to use a vacuum cleaner, if you break a linear fluorescent lamp, as the discharge from the vacuum cleaner may add the chemicals into the air. It is best to avoid linear fluorescents that are damaged, or discolored. Keep away from children and pets.


Fluorescent Tube Storage 
The storage of linear Fluorescent tubes by businesses is regulated. Lamps in storage must be kept dry and not near open flames or water sources. Burned out lamps must be recycled appropriately. There are State and Federal rules on storage and disposal. Please review suggested methods of clean up and storage, listed in DOE and OSHA guidelines. Violations are critical


Foot Candles
A Foot Candle is equal to one lumen per square foot…Originally it was literally the light of a candle at a one foot distance
Halide Light Fixtures
These large industrial fixtures are part of a group of warehouse lights that produce a pool of light equal to 400 watts. They are very inefficient, and require a start up period. These fixtures can be identified by the large aluminum reflector, which is circular and surrounds the lamp. In addition there is a transformer above the reflector. These units are obsolete.


HID Light Fixtures
When found in industrial applications, these large fixtures are part of a group of warehouse lights that produce a pool of light. They are known as Metal halide or High Intensity Discharge lighting. Other then use in photography or aquariums they are obsolete, and very inefficient.

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: An electrician can measure the voltage in the circuits in the lights in your office. The circuits may all be 120 volt OR they may be 208 /277 volts.
Our kits are all wired for 120 VOLT ONLY, not higher voltages. If you have higher voltages, you may need rewiring to 120 Volts to retrofit your fixtures.
.KNOW THE VOLTAGES BEFORE ANYONE TOUCHES ANY WIRES. 

 If you do not know the Voltages…STOP…Call an Experienced Electrician. He can rewire the circuits, and may be able to use some, or all, of the wiring in place.

High voltages can kill or incapacitate you, and that includes 120 Volt AC… the current in your own living room.

In Sure® Wire Connectors


In Sure® connectors are multi use wire connectors for connecting several wires in a harness, that meet all Commercial and Industrial lighting requirements. They come in many sizes and are an upgrade to standard wire nuts in many applications.
Kelvin Lamp Colors
Lighting is rated in Kelvin Temperature, just as the Sun is rated in Kelvin temperatures.
The Kelvin rating gives the approximate color of the light the lamp produces. At the lower end is the 3400 Degrees Kelvin lamp, which is on the yellow side. At about 4000 Kelvin, the light changes to Cool White, at about 5000 Kelvin the light changes to Day Light and at 6000 Kelvin the light is in the bluer range.


Ladder Safety
Use of ladders is regulated under OSHA and other regulations in the work place. The ladders chosen in the work place must have weight and stability ratings, as well as specialized construction. Please review the OSHA ladder data for specifics for the use of ladders in your application. As a rule, never use the top two steps of ladder for standing. Always secure the ladder at its feet, and be careful to ascend and descend the ladder with caution.
 

LED Arrays
Light Emitting Diodes, or LED’s can be spread into a grouping that will create a certain lighting pattern. This pattern and the LED’s that create it are referred to as an LED array.


Lighting Heat Dissipation
Heat is created by Lighting. The outflow of this heat is called Heat Dissipation. Seek lighting that creates as little heat as possible, and dissipates that heat as well as possible, to reduce cooling costs. Incandescent lamps are about 90% heat and 10% light. That is why they burn so hot. These types of lamps are being phased out for this reason. In addition to looking for lighting that has a good rating of Lumens per Watt, also look for lighting which produces less heat. CFL’s are well rated in this regard.

Lock out / Tag out
Lock out Tag out is the OSHA mandated process that requires Commercial and Industrial electric repair technicians to lock out each circuit, or tag out every switch , or both. Lock out / Tag Out is not optional.

Lumens 
A measurement of light which is comprised of “luminous flux,” which is energy within the range of frequencies we perceive as light. A lumen is equal to the amount of light emitted per second in a unit solid angle of one steradian emitted from a uniform source.


Lumens Per Watt or LPW
The LPW or Lumens Per Watt is the amount of light that a given wattage produces from source to surface. The higher the lumens per watt the better. For example, a 60 watt incandescent bulb produces 800 lumens. A 13 watt CFL also produces 800 lumens. The CFL produces over 4 times as many Lumens Per Watt, as the incandescent.


LUX
LUX  is the unit of illumination emitted; measuring luminous flux in a specific area. It is equal to one lumen per square meter.


Magnetic Ballasts
Original ballasts used in many light fixtures change the frequency of the transmission from low to high using magnetism. Thus the Magnetic ballast, which has coils for the purpose.


Mercury Vapor Light Fixtures
These large industrial fixtures are part of a group of warehouse lights that produce a pool of light. They are very inefficient, and require a start up period. These fixtures can be identified by the large aluminum reflector, which is circular and surrounds the lamp. In addition there is a transformer above the reflector. These units are obsolete.


NECA Code 
The National Electric Code is administered and updated by NECA. Updates occur every two years or so, and may vary in use from one jurisdiction to another. Local Codes usually follow this Code Administration, or a very close parallel to it.


Opening  Fluorescent Suspended Ceiling Light Fixtures
Opening a 2 by 2 or 2 by 4 suspended ceiling fluorescent light fixture varies with the size and style. Many use two clips mounted on the edge of the housing that holds the diffuser panel. These clips may rock, slide or pivot, as the make changes. Look for the fastener on the edge of the diffuser panel housing, and gently move it to see which fastener is employed. If the fastener is a slide, it will retract. If it is a rocker, it will teeter back and forth, and if it is a pivot style, it will pull down with gentle pry of a small screw driver. Regardless of the fastener, do not force it. Forcing it will often crack the diffuser panel if it is opened forcefully, or heavily pryed.


Strip Fluorescent Light fixtures
Linear lamp light fixtures that are placed in rows, or end to end are call strip lighting. The short name is therefore Strip Fluorescent fixtures. These are often made up of an 8 foot metal box containing a ballast terminal ends and two 70 to 90 watt 8 foot lamps. These fixtures are inefficient and can be retrofitted to save energy and maintenance. 


Suspended Ceiling Light Fixture Troubleshooting
Trouble shooting these 2 by 2 and 2 by 4 suspended ceiling light fixtures can be a chore. When a lamp fails, the adjoining lamp flickers, or buzzes. In addition, the failure can be in the lamps, the terminal ends, the wiring harness, or the transformer ballast located under the access panel. Be patient, and eliminate the possible failures one by one…or retrofit your suspended ceiling fixtures using the Green Light Kit CFL system. This system has none of these parts, so none fail..


Ten Thousand Hour Life Cycle
The operating life of a circuit is rated in hours. Some CFL lamps are rated at 10,000 plus hours to failure. To put that in perspective, 10,000 hours is equal to over 2.5 years  of 10 hour a day use… every day… year around. 


Troffer Light Fixtures
The formal name for suspended ceiling light fixtures is Troffer Style Lumenaires, or Troffer Light fixtures.


Troffer fixture (suspended ceiling light fixture) Cleaning
Suspended ceiling light fixtures can dim due to discoloration of the lens or dirt build up on the surface of the reflector or diffuser. Cleaning can be done AFTER turning out the light and tagging the switch as off, with several common cleaning products that are available that state they are for cleaning windows. ALWAYS turn off the fixture and lock it out first.


Troffer Fixture (suspended ceiling light fixture) Slots
Troffer style fixtures used in suspended ceilings often have slots in the top of the metal housing that holds the cover on the ballast, and wiring compartment. These slots can be used to quickly retrofit any fixture that has them.  These slots are important to know when you intend to retrofit a light fixture in a suspended ceiling.


Troffer Fixture Tabs
Troffer style fixtures used in suspended ceilings often have tabs in the top of the metal housing that holds the cover on the ballast, and wiring compartment. These tabs can be used to quickly retrofit any fixture that has them.  These slots are important to know when you intend to retrofit a light fixture in a suspended ceiling.

T 5 lamps
T5 lamps are linear fluorescent lamps that come in several lengths. They are about 
Five eights of an inch in diameter, (1.57 cm), thus the use of the 5 in the name. These are high efficiency lamps, with a long service life, that give out a very high Lumen Per Watt ratio. Think of these lamps in retrofits for strip lighting, to save energy and maintenance.


T 8 lamps
T8 lamps are linear fluorescent lamps that come in several lengths. They are about 
Eight / Eights of an inch in diameter, or 1 inch, ( 2.54 cm), thus the use of the 8 in the name. T8 lamps are often used in retrofit applications, but have draw backs, as they have complex wiring harnesses, ballasts, plastic terminal ends, and can buzz and flicker when a lamp fails. These are a good start at energy savings, but not the best choice in many applications.


T 12 lamps
T12 lamps are linear fluorescent lamps that come in several lengths. They are about 
Twelve / Eights of an inch in diameter, or 1.375 inches, ( 3.5 cm), thus the use of the 12 in the name. T12 lamps are often found in suspended ceiling light fixtures, strip lighting in warehouses, and in 8 foot 2 lamp single fixtures. T12 lamps have many draw backs, as they have complex wiring harnesses, ballasts, plastic terminal ends, and can buzz and flicker when a lamp fails. These lamps are big energy wasters, fail frequently, and many are fully obsolete. These T12 style fixtures require upgrade and retrofit, in nearly every application.


110 to 120 Volt AC Power Supply
110 Volt 60 HZ to 117 Volt 60 HZ power supplies are used in many applications in North America. They are often just called 110 or 120 power, incorrectly as a generic term. This power is delivered using one “hot” energized, lead wire, One neutral lead wire, and one ground lead wire. This power uses alternating current that switches poles 60 times per second. This power is considered high voltage and can kill or maim you. This power is often used to supply office lighting, and commercial light duty lighting, found in stores and commercial applications. Many fixtures that are retrofitted, use this power supply. Check with your technician or electrician, about  using this power to supply lighting. Used correctly, it can be both efficient, and easy, to operate and control costs of service and maintenance.

208 Delta Power Supply
208 Volt Delta power is used in some Commercial and many Industrial applications. It is derived through the use of multiple  ”hot” energized leads, as well as one neutral lead, and one ground lead. This form of wiring can be created by using 2 hot leads and a neutral lead from the center terminal of the supply…IT IS HIGH VOLTAGE…Your electrician may be able to rewire this configuration to allow retrofit of CFL style lamps. If you are not an electrician this power is not for you.  DO NOT TOUCH IT.


240 Volt Power Supply
240 Volt power, (also known as 220 generically), is used in some Commercial and many Industrial applications. It is derived through the use of multiple  ”hot” energized leads, as well as one neutral lead, and one ground lead…IT IS HIGH VOLTAGE. Your electrician may be able to rewire this configuration to allow retrofit of CFL style lamps. If you are not an electrician this power is not for you. Do not touch it. DO NOT TOUCH IT.


480 Volt AC Power Supply
480 Volt, 3 Phase, 60 HZ voltage is often supplied to Industrial buildings to run machinery at a higher efficiency level. THIS WIRING IS HIGH VOLTAGE, AND CAN KILL OR MAIM YOU. This power is almost never used to supply general lighting, and will not be used at this power level, in the circuits used to light offices and stores.
 480 Volt systems are highly effective service wiring for utility level applications. These systems are broken down in the facility to supply 120 Volt, 208 volt,277 volt, and 240 volt circuits, at industrial locations. 480 Power is derived by splitting down very high voltage supplies, provided  at service pole transformers and utility plants. DON”T EVEN THINK ABOUT TOUCHING IT.

IMPORTANT NOTE: An electrician can measure the voltage in the circuits in the lights in your office. The circuits may all be 120 volt OR they may be 208 /277 volts,.
Our kits are all wired for 120 VOLT ONLY, not higher voltages. If you have higher voltages, you may need rewiring or power lead changes, to 120 Volts to retrofit your fixtures.

KNOW THE VOLTAGES BEFORE ANYONE TOUCHES ANY WIRES. 
If you do not know the Voltages…STOP…Call an Experienced Electrician. He can rewire the circuits, and may be able to use some, or all, of the wiring in place.

High voltages can kill or incapacitate you, and that includes 120 Volt AC… the current in your own living room.